• TOPICS
  • EVENTS

    Business Writing and Presentations
    Wed., Sep. 4-Dec. 11, 2019
    6:25-9 p.m. ET
    New York University
    (graduate course)

    Presentation Skills for Introverts®
    Thu., Mar. 26 & Apr. 2, 2020
    6-8:55 p.m. ET
    New York University
    (2-session workshop)

    PAST WEBINARS AVAILABLE ON DEMAND:

    How to "Talk the Talk" at Professional Events (free)
    Columbia University Alumni Career Services

    How to Think on Your Feet: Improv Skills for Business
    Co-facilitators: Nancy Ancowitz and Carl Kissin
    American Management Association

    How to Deliver Powerful Presentations as an Introvert
    American Management Association

    Essential Management Skills for Introverts
    American Management Association

    How to Project Confidence with Demanding People
    American Management Association

    Secrets of Successful Public Speaking
    American Management Association

    SAMPLING OF IN-HOUSE WORKSHOPS:

    Tango for Leaders
    For organizations

    Success Strategies for Introvert Leaders
    National Institutes of Health
    (Workshop for NIH employees only)

  • BOOK REVIEWS
    Publisher's Weekly
    "Best Books"
    The New York Times
    "Currently winning our race for most intriguing book title of 2009 is the oxymoronic “Self-Promotion for Introverts” by Nancy Ancowitz (McGraw Hill). The 'how to' book is filled with tips (rehearse is a favorite). The author’s tone is supportive and she does not argue that introverts should become live wires. But what else would you expect from a book whose subtitle is 'the quiet guide to getting ahead'?"
    The Wall Street Journal
    "…showing how quiet people can turn their innate strengths into an advantage when networking."
    ABC News
    "Best Book Gifts"
    Los Angeles Times
    "Whatever's behind your reluctance to speak out for yourself, this is the first book I've seen with serious research on the topic that leads to a new game plan."
    CIO Insight
    "Must-Read Fall Books for IT Execs"
    Star-Ledger
    "Best New Career Books"
    POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGY NEWS DAILY
    "Offers a solid dose of practical advice—alongside humorous anecdotes.... Ancowitz shows introverts how to take advantage of the unique qualities and strengths they can offer."
    The Independent Consultant
    "There is great value in this book, whether you are promoting your own business or consulting practice, or just want to be sure your talents are recognized within your larger organization."
    Small Business Trends
    "Written by an introvert for introverts."
    Ft. Myers Florida Weekly
    "'Self-Promotion for Introverts' is a primer on doing just that—helping 'quiet sorts' assert themselves by using their inherent tendencies in the most effective ways."
    Women and Leadership Australia
    "Pitched perfectly. Our rating: 10/10."

Insights on Your Inbox: 1-Word E-mails from Your Boss


“Many employees labor over emails seeking guidance from the boss, only to receive a cryptic reply such as ‘Great!’ or ‘Sounds good’—or no answer at all. The result: Confusion and frustration,” according to Sue Shellenbarger in her article, “Email Enigma: When the Boss’s Reply Is Cryptic,” in The Wall Street Journal. For those of you feeling that confusion or frustration, read on. The article includes anecdotes about bosses and their employees who effectively maneuver this tricky dynamic.

In addition to the quips I offer, several boss-employee pairs, including my client Bryan Janeckzo, founder and chief executive of Wicked Start Consulting, and his director of operations, Bill Littman, share their success stories. Janeczko, an extrovert, describes what he’s learned about communicating by email with Littman, an introvert. The article also describes how Cheryl Cofield, director of culture, diversity and inclusion, and her boss, Pearl Alexander, senior director for people strategies (also colleagues of mine) at the Georgia Institute of Technology, adjusted their approach to email to work better with one another’s personal styles.

Also on point is Jack Appleman, author of 10 Steps to Successful Business Writing, who stresses the importance of changing your subject line to reflect the topic of your email; coincidentally, his book is required reading for a graduate course I teach on business writing and presentation skills at New York University.

Check out Shellenbarger’s article for a welcome dose of insights to interpret your inbox. As she puts it, “Understanding your communication style—and those of your co-workers—can help avert miscues.”

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